“How To Be A Good Guest”

NOTE: We have been home for just over 2 weeks from a close to 7 month hospitalization. This blog post has been sitting in my ‘draft’ since late August. It’s interesting now to read it and reflect on our experience of such a short time ago. I want to say that our family is very grateful to the excellent medical professionals who have taken care of Kate. This is unedited and unrevised. A raw reflection of hospital living.

 

Living in the hospital with your sick child is not something I would wish on my worst enemy.  It is a sad and lonely existence.  It is stressful, exhausting and scary.

You lose all control over your life in hospital: personal space, likes/dislikes, routine, and decision making. You are reminded almost daily that you are not in control, that your autonomy as a parent is no longer. That discussions and decisions about your child, you, and your family will often happen without your presence or input.

And you have no choice. Your child is sick. You need to live this life, sleeping on a small cot, being woken throughout the night because of alarms or lights, physically and emotionally exhausted, separated from home – family and friends, eating what and when you can, limited from going outside or fresh air, living with incredible stress among strangers, all while dealing with incredible stress and heartache.

And you always need to remember to be a gracious guest. Smile. Say Thank You (a lot). Guard your emotions. Accommodate any interruptions of medical staff to your room. Repeat your child’s story endlessly and readily. Expect to meet an endless stream of medical personnel. Try to greet everyone by their title – despite the fact that for months on end they will simply call you ‘mom’. Expect no routine. Be agreeable with waiting all day for 5 minutes with a doctor. And be vigilant about keeping you child safe.

 

Be. A. Gracious. Guest. 

 

Check your emotions at the door – AT ALL TIMES. An almost impossible task given the circumstances you are living, but a clear expectation by those whose ‘house’ you are visiting.

If you are lucky, you’ll work with a medical team who are compassionate, patient, communicative, flexible and transparent. Doctors and nurses who understand your journey and the stress that comes along with it. Professionals who aren’t jaded by working with endless little patients and endless upset and frustrated parents.

Let me warn you. This type of environment and medical team cannot be an expectationWe have been lucky for the most part.

Hospital life is a constant delicate balance about living out a working relationship that includes respect and civility, but in an environment that is created and controlled solely by the medical professionals, and for the parent, under situations of extreme personal stress.

 

House Guest Rules:

  1.  Be Clear About How Long You Will Stay

I don’t want to be here. I would prefer not to be ‘visiting’. I’m sorry, but we have no idea how long we will be staying. I am not in control.

2. No Surprises Please

After living 8 years with a child who suffers from an ultra-rare disease, ‘no surprises’ has definitely been taken off the table. We will surprise you daily. 

3. Choose The Perfect Gift

I will bring you coffee, tea, Timbits, a fruit basket, cookies for the night shift. We are grateful for all that you do for us.

4. House Rules Rules

We will do our best to adjust to your ‘rules’, but we would appreciate some flexibility and compassion about the fact that we are reluctant guests and that some ‘rules’  are not to the benefit of our child. But again, I understand…I am not in control

5. Be Appropriate

I assure you, I am a calm, rationale and appropriate human being 99.9% of the time. I hope you understand that this is an incredibly challenging and difficult time for our family, and I am doing my best to be appropriate. If I am not at all times, I hope you are empathetic and able to be there to support me.

6. Help Out

I will do everything I can to help out. Changing beds, managing my child, helping with meds, holding her down for procedures, interpreting for you and for her etc.

7. Entertain Yourself

Done. An endless supply of stickers, play dough, colouring, puzzles, dolls, toys, crafts to play with. I’ve updated my Netflix subscription as well, and found a few magazines and books to flip through.

8. BYO

If only! An occasional glass of shiraz in a beautiful wine glass shared with a good friend would be so amazing right now.

9. Leave No Trace

Keep our room neat and tidy. Check. We’ll likely leave a trace with you though. Kate is just too adorable to forget. 

10. Give Thanks

We are both grateful and we say thank you every single day.

 

As a patient-mom, I have lived more than my fair share of out-patient, in-patient, short and long term hospitalizations. I understand the medical system and I know how to navigate it – most of the time (it can be difficult and confusing still).

I am a good person, a good mom, and excellent patient advocate. My goal is to keep my daughter safe and well cared for, and I have clear expectations about how that is to be done. It doesn’t always fit with the ‘house rules’ of the medical professional I am working with. So I go back to my “etiquette” and do my best to get done what needs to be done in a collaborative and professional manner. Often times I am relied upon by these same professionals to help them understand my daughter better because of the complexity of her condition. But I am a mom. And I get tired and emotional and scared – and I am not always going to have the patience to say everything in my nice voice. I am not always the perfect “guest”, but I think I come pretty darn close. It comes with working within the imperfect environment of a hospital, and I think needs to be appreciated and understood by everyone involved in the care of a sick child.

 

Julie

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  1. “If you are lucky, you’ll work with a medical team who are compassionate, patient, communicative, flexible and transparent.” Had to stop reading after that sentence, and consider if I wanted to go any further. As the father and main caregiver of a child with an extremely rare and always fatal condition, I’ve spent the last 18 years in and out of hospital with my son. Correction, in and out of many hospitals. This mythical supportive staff exists somewhere, I’m certain. But when medical professionals know your child’s condition is fatal, or the opposite, they don’t know that it is fatal, apathy is the norm.
    Of course they aren’t going to care as much about your child as you do. Of course they are swamped, understaffed, hounded by first time parents who are hysterical about their baby’s runny nose, I get that. But it begins and ends with a compassionate staff. Without that, you have…nothing.
    The why of it is complex and simple at the same time, depending on what element you’re looking at. The end result though is that incompetence goes hand in hand with disinterest and my son, does not see the inside of hospitals any more.

    Reply

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